Broncos tribute concert attracts thousands including star NHL players

first_imgSASKATOON – Canadian country singer Gord Bamford reached over after performing the song “Little Guy” and grabbed the hand of Carson Haugan, the son of late Humboldt Broncos coach Darcy Haugan.Carson, wearing a white Broncos jersey, was given a standing ovation by the crowd of over 10,000 that packed SaskTel Centre Friday night for a tribute concert to remember those killed in the April 6 bus crash.“That was a tough one for me,” Bamford said after finishing the song he wrote for his own son, Nash, who was also on stage.The Broncos were on their way to a Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League playoff game when their team bus and a tractor-trailer collided at an intersection.Sixteen people — including 10 players — were killed and another 13 people were injured.Chants of “Go Broncos Go” rang through the crowd as Broncos family members and current and former NHL players joined country star Dallas Smith on stage to end the night.Current NHL players such as Sean Monahan of the Calgary Flames and Brendan Gallagher of the Montreal Canadiens were in attendance. Four-time Olympic gold medallist Hayley Wickenheiser along with Paralympian Greg Westlake were also there.The group of hockey players laid sticks in front of a Broncos jersey prior to the concert and the display remained throughout the evening.“We’ve been through a storm in this province of Saskatchewan these last few weeks,” Premier Scott Moe said. “We were plunged into the darkness when this terrible incident took place.“And though there is still darkness, there is daylight on the horizon.”The Hunter Brothers from Saskatchewan sang the national anthem and later encouraged the crowd to sing along to “Amazing Grace.”Chad Brownlee played a rendition of Tom Cochrane’s “Big League.”A video message from surviving Broncos player Brayden Camrud was played before the performances began along with a message from Chris Joseph, whose son Jaxon died in the crash.The crowd, dressed in cowboy hats and boots along with hockey jerseys, also gave first responders in attendance a standing ovation.Brett Kissel, as well as fellow Juno winner Jess Moskaluke, played some of their biggest hits.On Thursday night, close to 50 current and former NHL players gave a standing ovation to families of the Broncos at a local hotel.Scott Thomas, whose son Evan died in the crash, didn’t expect to see such a big crowd.“You could see the pain in their faces, you could see the respect that they have for what we’re going through as parents, as hockey people,” Thomas said.“There’s just a lot of emotion in the room.”Just over a week ago, Thomas held a memorial service at SaskTel Centre for his son in his hometown.Thomas said his emotions hadn’t changed much since the memorial service.“It’s still raw, absolutely raw,” he said. “There’s still a void there that will probably be there for the rest of my life. But I know once everybody gets in there, the feeling of love is going to be the same.”Longtime Dallas Stars forward and Hall of Famer Mike Modano said that being with the families of the Broncos on Thursday night was really hard.“I think that was the first time a lot of those families had been together since the accident,” he said. “It was really heart wrenching to just kind of be there and put some names to the faces finally that we’ve heard about.”Humboldt resident Yvette Crane travelled to the concert and said that the Broncos helped the community a lot.“I used to go to their hockey games all the time and I just love ’em,” she said.Note: The Country Thunder Music Festival, which booked the evening’s musical acts, says money from the $65 concert tickets will also be donated to the families.— Follow @RyanBMcKenna on Twitter.last_img read more

MARINE FORECAST 20 Jan 2015

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppMARINE FORECAST FOR THE BAHAMAS FOR 24 HOURS FROM 6:00PM MONDAY 19TH JANUARY 2015, ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY AT 2130 UTCNO WARNINGS…GENERAL SITUATION: A TROUGH ACROSS THE NORTHWEST BAHAMAS ALONG WITH A WEAK FRONT NEAT THE CENTRAL BAHAMAS WILL INFLUENCE WEATHER ACROSS THE ISLANDS THROUGH TOMOROWFOR THE NORTHWEST BAHAMASWINDS: NORTHEAST TO EAST AT 10 TO 15 KNOTS OVER OPEN WATERS SEAS: 2 TO 4 FEET OVER THE OCEANWEATHER: NO SIGNIFICANT WEATHERFOR THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHEAST BAHAMAS & TURKS AND CAICOSADVISORY: SMALL CRAFT SHOULD EXERCISE CAUTIONWINDS: NORTHEASTERLY AT 15 TO 20 KNOTS OVER OPEN WATERS SEAS: 4 TO 6 FEET OVER THE OCEANWEATHER: BREEZY WITH THE SLIGHT CHANCE OF A PASSING SHOWER.OVERNIGHT LOW TEMPERATURE: 63°F 17°CDAYTIME HIGH TEMPERATURE: 78°F 26°C MOONRISE: 06:44 AM TUE. HIGH TIDE: 06:44 PMMOONSET: 06:12 PM TUE. LOW TIDE: 12:53 AM TUE. HIGH TIDE: 07:15 AM TUE. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Marine Forecast 18th August 2015 Bahamas Marine Forecast – 10th August 2015 Related Items:bahamas weather, turks and caicos weather Recommended for you Noon Bahamas Marine Forecastlast_img read more

NPR Host Robert Siegel Signs Off

first_imgStephen Voss/NPRRobert Siegel hosted NPR’s All Things Considered for 30 years. He retires after working at NPR for over 40 years.The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the median number of years that American workers have been working for their current employer is a little over four.I say that to acknowledge how unusual it is that I have been working at National Public Radio for a little over 40 years — 41, to be precise.For the past 30 years, I’ve been doing the same job: hosting All Things Considered. And doing it very happily.No one is more surprised by my tenure than I am.NPRRobert Siegel opened NPR’s first overseas bureau in London. He was posted there from 1979 to 1983.I came to NPR on what I thought was an unfortunate, but necessary detour that — I hoped and figured — would last a couple of years.I’m a native New Yorker and the New York FM radio station where I worked was sold in 1976 and — to put it mildly — I didn’t figure in the new owner’s plans.Leaving New York felt like what I imagine it feels like when a player for the Yankees was sent down to play for the Toledo Mud Hens.No matter, I figured, I would work my way back to civilization.The fact that I am still here is a tribute to how colossally wrong I was about that.At the NPR of the late 1970s, I found myself among a team of young, creative people, as un-cynical a group of broadcasters I could have possibly imagined.At a time when our audience research was by today’s standards limited and primitive, we operated on what I still consider a healthy instinct. We put on a program that we, ourselves would listen to.We didn’t imagine a great distinction between people like us, who reported the news, and people like you, who listened to it.We weren’t the only curious people in the country. There had to be millions more Americans out there who would welcome a smart, conversational program about politics, culture, science, the arts and just plain fun.NPRRobert Siegel interviews Xiaoyu Xie, a pianist who grew up in Chengdu in China’s Sichuan province, during a reporting trip in 2008. Siegel and other All Things Considered staff were there when a devastating magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck.Despite some near death experiences many years ago, NPR is still here, much bigger, much more listened-to, much more important than it was way back then.But what remains the same is that authentic sense of purpose, still undimmed by cynicism or commercialism.A very accomplished friend of mine used to speak of the last paragraph in a story, the windup, as the “And-So.”And so, for the last time I’m signing off, proud of my association with this unique institution, mindful of things I might have done better, grateful for the company of thousands of gifted colleagues, and thankful to you, for being — as we used to say in those hackneyed but truthful fundraising messages — for being the public in public radio.I’m Robert Siegel. And you’re listening to All Things Considered from NPR News.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

Mamata remembers Tapashi Mallick on her death anniversary

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday remembered Tapashi Mallick, who was raped and then burnt alive by goons allegedly close to CPI(M), during the movement to resist acquisition of farmland in Singur in 2006.On Tapashi’s death anniversary, Banerjee tweeted: “Today is Tapashi Mallick’s death anniversary. She was raped and burnt alive during the farmer movement in 2006. I pay respect to the martyrs who had been killed during the 34 years of Left rule.” Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe brutal killing of Mallick had accelerated the farmer movement in Singur, which was organised to oppose acquisition of farmland by the former state government to set up an automobile factory. Intellectuals including poets, scholars and writers got united to support the movement led by Mamata Banerjee and the Singur movement became the Waterloo of Left Front rule in Bengal. Later, the then Chief Minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee had confessed in an interview on a vernacular television channel that the decision to acquire farmland to set up the factory was wrong. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedIt may be mentioned that a tomb is coming up in Singur, where the names of all those who had laid down their lives during the farmer movement will be engraved. The incident in Singur has been included in the history syllabus in schools. During the Left Front rule, hundreds of youths had been killed. In Netai, Nanur and Nandigram, helpless villagers were brutally killed by the goons appointed by Left Front, who had unleashed a reign of terror throughout Bengal.last_img read more

Learn earn rewards with Hotel Xcaret Mexicos new agent platforms

first_imgLearn & earn rewards with Hotel Xcaret Mexico’s new agent platforms Tags: Agent Incentives, Mexico, Xcaret RIVIERA MAYA — Hotel Xcaret Mexico, an all-inclusive luxury resort situated by the Riviera Maya jungle, has launched two new agent platforms for both learning and rewards.The Xpert Course is an e-learning platform where agents will receive the content and tools needed to properly sell the hotel and grow their sales. It places special emphasis on the property’s ‘All-Fun Inclusive’ concept that includes complimentary access to Experiencias Xcaret’s eight nature parks and tours. Other topics covered in the course include the hotel’s unique design, its ‘all-view’ adult- or family-oriented suites, and its 19 restaurants and bars.The course is free and includes nine lessons detailing the hotel’s accommodations, restaurants and bars, MICE facilities, Corporate Social Responsibility program, weddings offering and more. Upon completion, participants can print their own certificate. Those eligible can also receive credits from the Association of Canadian Travel Agencies (ACTA).In addition to the new course, the hotel has also launched Xcaret Rewards, an incentives program that allows agents to earn cash and free stays at the property.More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckStarting Nov. 1, the program will grant registered travel agents cash prices of US$50 for every 3-5 night bookings, and US$100 for stays of six nights or longer. Agents in Canada and the U.S. with an IATA or CLIA number are eligible to enroll, and stays may be booked directly, through GD or a tour operator.As for Experiencias Xcaret parks and tours reservations, the Xcaret Rewards team has created a three-tier system in which agents will be eligible to receive free nights for up to two guests, based on the amount of guests booked to visit any park and/or tour.To enroll in Xcaret Rewards, go to xcaretrewards.com. Share Alex Keerma Thursday, November 1, 2018 Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> About Latest Posts Alex Keerma Latest posts by Alex Keerma (see all) WestJet adds to network, nonstop flights between Austin and Calgary – May 3, 2019 Senior Travel Advisor – Peterborough Office – April 12, 2019 “I didn’t know she was married”: Kimpton’s social experiment inspires new themed rooms – March 6, 2019last_img read more